Flow Paint or Pouring Acrylics

Pouring Acrylic Paint Like a Pro. … Many of those effects can be achieved by pouring acrylic paint. Pouring is a great way to smooth out unwanted texture, get marbleized effects, rich colored glazes and add some fun to your painting process.

You don’t need ‘talent’ to be an acrylic pouring artist – just enthusiasm, some basic instruction, and a willingness to try, fail and try again. Paint along and you’ll soon make great art.

What is a Dirty Pour?

Dirty pour – a technique where all colors are added to a cup or container at the same time and then poured together to create an acrylic pouring paint effect. A flip cup (see below) is also a form of dirty pour.

What is a Flip Cup?

Flip cup – a form of dirty pour (see above). All colors are added to a cup or container, the canvas or surface is placed painting side down onto the cup and then the two together are turned upside down without the paint escaping. The cup is lifted allowing the paint to escape and flow across the canvas.

What is Dipping?

Dip / dipping – a form of acrylic pour or flow painting where the surface is dipped into the mixed paint to create interesting designs and cells. This is often used as a way of creating art from paint that spilled over the edges of other paintings, to avoid waste.

What is a Funnel Pour?

Funnel pour – paint colors are added to a funnel with the end blocked. Once all paints are added, the end of the funnel is released and the paints flow onto the canvas as the funnel is moved to create the design.

What is a Colander Pour?

Another fun technique…come to the workshop and learn about it.

What is Bottle Bottom Acrylic Pouring?

Another fun technique…come to the workshop and learn about it

Is there a recipe to this technique?

Yes, and you will learn how to use it.

What about the whole torch thing?

Most folks who use silicone also make use of a culinary torch, to help finish up the cell-making process. When you run the torch lightly over the surface of your painting it serves two functions:

  1. Air bubbles are heated, come to the surface, and pop, so when your painting drys, you won’t end up with holes and defects in the paint
  2. The oil is heated, causing it and the surrounding paint to flow even more. The silicone oil rises to the surface, bringing colors with it and creating movement in the paint, which creates cells. Typically torching leads to lots of small cells, rather than fewer, larger cells.

If you’re going for fewer, larger cells, you may not want to torch. You’ll also find that using a good amount of Floetrol in your mix helps level the materials, so torching isn’t always needed. But…it looks darn good!

What will I need for this workshop?

  • At least  x 4 small 30 x 30cm canvasses (or more)
  • l or 2 L bottles of Wood Glue
  • Silicon Oil or Spray
  • Small Chefs Torch (available at Gas Shop or Hardware store)
  • Acrylic Paint + lots of white
  • Straws
  • Mixing Cups / paper or polystyrene cups
  • Gloves – to keep hands clean
  • Black bag
  • Newspaper
  • Ink (Get at Creative Arts)
  • Empty water bottle or cool drink bottles
  • Scissors
  • Plastic Colander

Book here

Flow Paint 6 – 7 November 9.30 to 12.30pm

  • 2 days
  • 9.30am to 12.30pm
  • R550.00 x 2 days
  • Click here to learn more…