How to paint accurately and get three dimensional values using dark and light

How to paint accurately and get three dimensional values using dark and light

Bistre, Grisaille and Verdachio are all classic methods used by the old master to get three dimensional realistic paintings.
This is a step by step explanation of Bistre by artist and teacher Leonie.e.Brown. It includes an explanation of how to mix your colours, what brush to use, how to apply the paint and how to look at your object.

How to draw what you see Art Workshop – day 3

How to draw what you see Art Workshop – day 3

Four ways to begin a portrait…

Four ways to begin a portrait…

How to draw what you see drawing workshop

How to draw what you see drawing workshop

Three day drawing workshop on how to draw and observe accurately.

Amazing results after only 2 hours!

 

How do we learn to see?

The brain has the amazing capacity to store items in an orderly fashion. One can almost say that it has a filing system with A for apple, B for banana, C for cat etc. When we draw an item the brain goes look for the storage file of when it first filed that item. It will go and fetch the first image it recorded of the item, for example an apple. That is what the brain will tell the hand to draw. It is already set into that pattern of what is saw and recorded the first time.

That is why we do not draw what we see, but what we think.

How do we overcome this problem?

The best way to do that is to use something called negative observation. 

The brain records what is sees as touchable and in front. That which we cannot touch, the open spaces around the object is called the negative space. The object (that I can touch) is the positive shape, the space around it is the negative space.

The negative space is defined by the edges of the positive space and the frame or border (our third element). So, part of our negative space is bounded by the frame and another part is bounded by the positive space. Sometimes the negative space is completely bounded by the positive space. What it important also to note is that the negative space also defines our subject.


 

                 

  • The positive space is masked in black in the second photo.
  • The negative space is masked in black in the third photo.

 


 

  • Positive on left, negative on right.

 

 

 

 


The best place to start is with the basic shapes.

All items, whether organic, natural or manmade can be descibed or simplified into four basic shapes:

  1. the circle / oval
  2. square
  3. cone
  4. cylinder

www.LifeARTschool.co.za - Leonie.e.Brown ARTist / www.lifeart.co.za /Art classes for adults, Cape Town

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This vase and flowers is made up out of:

  • 9 x  ovals
  • 1 x cone

 

We will be drawing an apple:

  1. Start off by finding the basic shape. in this case we draw an apple.
  2. The basic shape of an apple is a circle.
  3. Start off by drawing the basic shape (step 2)
  4. Draw a square around it (step 3)
  5. Draw a line through the centre both horizontally and vertically (step 4)
  6. Focus on drawing the shape of the top right square, not the apple. Do not even look at the apple. Only focus on the white space. The part that touches the apple is actually the bottom shape of the square.
  7. Proceed to the next  x 3 squares in the same manner.
  8. When you draw your lines, draw short lines of maximum one cm long connected to each other. Do not draw one continues line.
  9. Keeping to short lines/strokes will help you to only look at the one cm you are busy drawing. The idea is to focus on the detail. Not the whole shape. This type of drawing is called ‘localized‘ drawing.

 

The workshop students managed to draw these drawings below (stage #1 + #2), with shading within 2 hours. None of them had any previous experience of drawing or shading.

 

 


The follow up workshop will be from 12 – 15 April 2016 at Whow studios.

We will be concentrating on understanding colour and how to create our own colours.

YOU MAY NOT THINK YOU CAN PAINT
YOU MAY NOT KNOW HOW TO MIX COLOURS.
YOU MAY NOT KNOW WHERE TO START.
YOU DON’T HAVE TO KNOW.
WHAT YOU NEED TO DO IS RELAX AND LET GO.
  1. Get excited about color and painting! Break some rules and paint with more fun/less frustration!
  2. Leonie fosters success for all regardless of experience/ skill level.
  3. Learn essential truths about real color vs. wheel color, and say “good-bye” to muddy color.
  4. Dare to try unfamiliar ways to think about and work with color.
  5. Explore advanced color interactions.
  6. Learn strategies for captivating light and shadow effects and dramatic depth illusion. Each day brings new focus and new paintings. Along with a head full of color master concepts, take home powerful new paintings.

Bookings: admin@whow.co.za

 

 

 

Lesson #2: The Position of the hand

Lesson #2: The Position of the hand

A lot of students ask me to teach them how to work ‘looser‘. What they don’t realize is that the position in which you hold your brush determine the ‘looseness or tightness’ of your painting. The choice and type of brush will also determine how the painting will look. 
 
 
It is important to understand what different brushes and different hand positions do. 
 
 

There are two basic positions to hold a brush or pencil:

Over hand or under hand
Over hand: Placing the brush or pencil over the centre of the hand as per normal writing 
Advantages
The position creates very controlled and precise markings.
 
 
 
Disadvantage
The position is limited and forces very stiff and controlled work.
 
 
 
 
Under hand: Placing the brush or pencil into the palm of the hand, as if stretching out your hand in greeting. 
 
 
 
Advantages
The position creates a loose and light dispersion of paint
 
 
Disadvantage
The position is limited.
 
 
 
 
 
 

There are three painting positions to hold a brush or pencil:

There are 3 main positions for holding a pencil or brush. The position you choose will determine your style of painting.
Position 1:
 
 

This position would be the same as holding a pen in the normal writing position. The only part of the hand that moves is the fingers. Imagine a pin going through the hand between the thumb and fore finger, anchoring the hand in position.

 
Advantages
The position creates very controlled and precise markings. This position automatically will lead to more realistic work.
 
The Dutch masters like Vermeer, Franz Haltz is a good example of this type of work: 
    

 
Disadvantage
The position is limited and forces very stiff and controlled work.
 
 
Position 2:
Slide the hand down towards the centre of the brush or pen. The same imaginary pin now sits in the wrist. The whole hand is now able to move, not just the fingers.
 
Advantages
The position is freer with a lot of movement happening in the wrist. This position automatically will lead to more impressionistic work. The movement of the wrist will reflect itself in the painting. Because the hand is further away from the front, there will be less pressure on the head of the brush/pencil which leads to lighter and freer marks
 
Example of work: The Impressionists like Monet, Manet, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Renoir etc.
 

Disadvantage

The position is not as accurate as the first position. 
 
 
Position 3:
Slide the hand down towards the end of the brush or pen. The same imaginary pin now sits at the elbow or shoulder. The whole arm is now able to move. The position of the feet and the body will also influence the stroke. 
 
 
Advantages
The position is very loose and open with a lot of movement and lines. This position automatically will lead to more expressionistic and abstract work. The movement of the arm and body will reflect itself in the painting. Because the hand is further away from the front of the brush, there will be less pressure on the head of the brush/pencil which leads to lighter and freer marks. Because the hand is now holding the end of the brush handle, very light pressure is possible, and very light marks or little paint will be deposited.
 
Example of work: The Brucke, Francis Bacon, Edward Much, Kandinsky
 

 
 
 
    
Disadvantage
Accuracy is almost impossible. Very large and confident movement needs to be made. 
 
 
Life Application
The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing. – Socrates l
Life is like holding a brush; the closer I am, the less of the total picture I see. The wise man always asks for perspective from others. 
 
 
 
 
 

LifeART School is mentioned in the Cape Town Magazine as one of the BEST Art schools in Cape Town!Come join us and learn from established teacher and artist: Leonie.e.Brown.

For more info contact Leonie on: leonie@lifeart.co.za

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