Techniques on Traditional Drawing

Techniques on Traditional Drawing

Traditional drawing is certainly way harder than digital and it is true that people are able to progress much faster digitally, but one should learn the traditional type of drawing and painting before starting digital drawing, since it often lays out the foundation for screen design.

This article contains a mixture of traditional drawing tutorials, drawing techniques and some methods for transforming and preparing your creations for screen design. Some are intermediate level and some are advanced tutorials that include general theory, useful tips, comic inspired art, sketch a pencil drawing, coloring processing, character sketching, shapes, proportional, perspective and much more. We hope that drawing tutorials and techniques in this post will be a great help to you.

Why is lemon yellow a ‘cold yellow’? (article by Mitch Albala) http://blog.mitchalbala.com/expanded-primaries-palette/

Why is lemon yellow a ‘cold yellow’? (article by Mitch Albala) http://blog.mitchalbala.com/expanded-primaries-palette/

Colors that dance together, Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Sienna

Colors that dance together, Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Sienna

Earth’s only Natural harmonies
It is simply not true that restricting the palette to earth colours only makes for dull brown paintings.


• Yellow Ochre
• Terra Cotta
• Red Ochre
• Raw and Burnt Sienna
• Raw and Burnt Umber
• Green Earth
• Mars Violet
• Venetian Red and Indian Red
• Various dusky rose and bluish greys
• Off whites

The 2 colour pick The colours that dance together
If you had to choose just 2 colours, what would they be, and why?French-Ultramarine-mixed-with-Burnt-Sienna-gives-a-strong-dark-color

Here is my suggestion: Ultramarine and Burnt Sienna. Together these 2 colours sing. They make the most delicious range of neutrals; the Sienna is fleshy enough for figure work, the Ultramarine perfect for the fleshy greys of shadows, and full strength they interact as complimentaries that remind you of summer days.
• Ultramarine Blue
• Burnt Sienna

 

The primaries palette How to make theory work
In theory the primaries should mix all colours. They don’t, due to the limitations of pigments. However careful choosing of the primaries used plus the addition of 2 other colours gives a very wide range of colours. The extras are White to lighten, and a Green that is dark enough to make good blacks when mixed with the Red.

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The secret to a primaries palette is to choose the cool versions of each colour. Cool colours mix together to make more colours than warm colours are capable of. Thus the Red is a cool red, crimson or alizarin in shade.

 

 

 

This palette makes many more colours than you would expect, but it lacks subtlety with flesh tones and colours.
• Permanent Alizarin
• Pthalo Blue
• Cadmium Yellow Light
• Pthalo Green or Viridian
• Titanium White

Warms and cools More options
If a warm Red and a warm Blue is added to the primaries palette then colour mixing becomes almost limitless. Flesh colours are richer and more varied and landscape is a breeze. Note that only the one yellow is needed.
• Permanent Alizarin
• Cadmium Red Light
• Pthalo Blue
• Ultramarine Blue
• Cadmium Yellow Light
• Pthalo Green or Viridian
• Titanium White

What’s up in the Wednesday class…The Search for Expressive Brushwork

What’s up in the Wednesday class…The Search for Expressive Brushwork

In Western painting, the use of thick, expressive brushstrokes emerged largely in the late-19th and early-20th centuries; the tendency is visible in many of Post-Impressionist Paul Cézanne’s landscapes, still lifes, and group portraits, as well as in Henri Matisse’s vivid Fauvist paintings.

The technique continues to be used by some of the most influential painters working today, including Cecily Brown and Jenny Saville.

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